Graziela Sousa

do fast and sustainable match?

Jul
18

Woke up to this piece on The Hill about Zara committing to using sustainable products by 2025.

I’m sorry. I really do not think Fast Fashion will ever be sustainable, it’s an oxymoron. It’s not about promising sustainable materials (as a consumer/wearer I hate viscose tbh) it should be about promoting other ways of doing fashion, of keeping up the newness or originality that give us this rush while offering new ways of doing, renewing, styling our closets or items.

The way we regard fashion is a very personal thing, as style goes even deeper. I think we all crave for individuality but on the other hand tend to mimic other people’s style or use them as role-models or good examples.

I’ve been on a personal journey regarding my clothes, haven’t been registering much, but will be in a few months. Most of them are vintage, upcycled, second hand or family hand-outs. A lot of people ask me about the items I wear, a lot of them are one-of-a-kind or just too hard to find similar, because they were made in the 80’s/90’s.

This thing about Zara/Inditex promising sustainability and circularity is something that bothers me and makes me so skeptical: isn’t this group one of the ones to blame for over-consumption of garments in the first place? Isn’t it logical that this sort of promise is just a way of making ‘us’ (consumers) feel a bit less guilty and free to choose cheap, trendy and non-lasting clothes?

Shouldn’t this large companies be the ones helping us (consumers) with trustworthy information and helping all workers across the whole chain to have better conditions?

I could live with an Inditex group which supported schools for garment industry worker’s children, which supported local craftsmanship, which helped consumers making their garments last with altering and repairing.

Not with one that makes a press realease saying ‘our materials will be 100% sustainable’ (subliminal text: You may be at ease and keep on buying.)